59 Years On Sunny Slope

March 31, 2015      9.9 miles      Highland Park

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The temporary No Parking sign is indeed a sign of spring. It means the post-winter street cleaning is imminent.

The trees remain bare, the sides of most streets are ensconced in five months of winter grit and the temperature dips quickly as evening approaches. But none of that matters because it’s March 31st and my bike and I are out of the basement and on the streets for the first ride of the year!

One has to look hard to find color this early in the spring – flowers aren’t poking out of the soil and the greening of lawns and trees is a few weeks off. At 1890 Yorkshire, the browns and grays made way for vibrant children’s artwork.

yorkshire artwork 1

yorkshire artwork 2

Colvin Avenue is another of the Highland Park streets, undulating and without sidewalks, that resemble the suburban landscape. Most of the homes are single story ramblers built on large lots in the 1950s The home at 1778 Colvin is in the midst of a major remodeling, but that’s not why I stopped. Rather, the movement of several deer in the front yard led me to scramble for my camera.

Three deer (on the right) ate while keeping watch on me at 1778 Colvin.

Three deer cautiously ate at 1778 Colvin Avenue.

One deer stared my camera and me down from about 20 feet away.

One deer stared my camera and me down from about 20 feet away.

Hilltop is a block long street that intersects Colvin on the south and Edgcumbe to the north. The name is a tipoff about the topography of the area.

Hilltop is a block long street that intersects Colvin on the south and Edgcumbe to the north. The name is a tip-off about the topography of the area.

After my dalliance with the deer, I followed Colvin Avenue north to Edgcumbe and traveled northwest on Edgcumbe for a block until the road turned south down the hill. About halfway down I saw this boulder retaining wall. Since I was moving at more than 20 miles per hour I had to turn around and climb back up Edgcumbe to take this picture.

about halfway down the Edgcumbe hill I saw this boulder retaining wall. Since I was moving at more than 20 miles per hour at the time I had to turn around and climb back up Edgcumbe to take this picture. I have dozens of questions about the construction of the wall.

I have dozens of questions about the construction of the wall, including, ‘How many boulders are in the wall?’, and ‘How are the rocks held in place?’.

Continuing down the Edgcumbe hill I shot right past the amusingly named Sunny Slope Lane. It’s one of the handful of streets in Highland Park I’d never ridden on in nearly 30 years living here, so I turned around to examine Sunny Slope Lane.

The Sunny Slope sign.

The Sunny Slope sign.

Sunny Slope is a cull-d-sac with about 10 houses built in the ‘50s and ‘60s on it.

Two of the homes on Sunny Slope Lane. Colvin Avenue sits atop the hill behind the grey house.

Two of the homes on Sunny Slope Lane. Colvin Avenue sits atop the hill behind the grey house.

A deer, quite likely one that I saw earlier on the ride, stands at the top of the hill, in what is the backyard of a Colvin Avenue home.

A deer, quite likely one that I saw earlier on the ride, stands at the top of the hill, in what is the backyard of a Colvin Avenue home.

As I took photos, one of the neighbors came out to ask me what I was doing. I explained the mission of my blog to Frank Windisch, a 59 year resident of Sunny Slope Lane. Frank and his wife Shirley had an appointment and couldn’t talk with me this evening but were quite willing to meet another time. That time ended up being the evening of April 6, and the temperature hovered below 40 as I rode to 1795 Sunny Slope for the interview.

Shirley and Frank Windisch in their home at 1795 Sunny Slope Lane.

Shirley and Frank Windisch in their home at 1795 Sunny Slope Lane.

Shirley explained that she and Frank moved to 1795 Sunny Slope in 1956 because Shirley’s father was a contractor who owned the lot on which the house was built. “Frank was in the service. When we came back from Germany – I was over there with him from 1954 to 56. And he (my Dad) had the lot and said, ‘I’d like to have you build a house on that lot.’ And so, we decided to do it.”

Shirley went on to say that her dad put some nice custom features into their home. “My dad had a real eye for construction. The ceiling is cedar and that’s 4 inches thick.” 4 x 4 tongue in groove boards.”

Another distinctive feature of their home arose from Shirley and Frank’s time overseas. “When we were in Germany in the Bavarian area there were homes that were ski chalets with the overhanging eaves; we loved those homes. So we said would like to have eaves that overhang further than the average eave does on the homes you’re building. He said, ‘We can do that.’”

The custom eaves on Shirley and Frank's home have a noticeably longer overhang than most.

The custom eaves on Shirley and Frank’s home have a noticeably longer overhang than most.

Frank added, “Aside from the design characteristics which we’ve always loved, it has prevented the sun from beating out the windows. The rains don’t come to the windows nearly as easily as if you had no eaves or very little eaves. These windows are the original windows when the house was constructed.”

The original driveway remains and is still used but instead of leading to the garage, there is the family room.

The original driveway remains and is still used but instead of leading to the garage, there is the family room. (Photo shot August 2015)

As Shirley and Frank’s family grew so did their need for more space. Frank said, “The house was originally a three bedroom rambler and then we had the garage turned into a family room, ’cause we had six kids and we needed more space.” A dining room and new garage were also added to the home.

The Windischs built a new garage with a deck on top, on the east end of their property.

The Windischs built a new garage with a deck on top, on the east end of their property. (Photo shot August 2015)

“We have a problem with runoff and springs. We’ve had a number of landslides over the years.”   Frank Windisch

According to Frank, the steep slope in the backyard has meant battling land slides, “We had three major slides and the last one was like four years ago, but I think that’s the end of it because it’s (the dirt) found its own level.

According to Frank, the steep slope in the backyard has meant battling land slides, “We had three major slides and the last one was like four years ago, but I think that’s the end of it because it’s (the dirt) found its own level.” (Photo shot August 2015)

Among the dozens of memorable neighborhood events over their 59 years there, one involved then-mayor John Daubney, who purchased a lot on Colvin, directly north and up the bluff from Shirley and Frank. “He had the lot filled in because there was just a big ravine there and that was directly behind us,” Frank told me. “He brought in fill from construction projects around the city and dumped all of that into that ravine and built a house on top of it. It took months to dump, dump, dump.”

Plants and trees cover the dirt poured into the ravine for construction of former Mayor Daubney's house on Colvin Avenue, behind and above the Windisch home.

Plants and trees cover the dirt poured into the ravine for construction of former Mayor Daubney’s house on Colvin Avenue, behind and above the Windisch home. (Photo shot August 2015)

Before building the mayor’s house on top of the new fill, Frank told me the sound of a pile driver echoed throughout the neighborhood, “They pounded timbers down til they hit bedrock then they could build the house on those timbers. And I still remember that boom, boom, boom for days.”

Most moms did not work outside the home in the 1950s and ‘60s, which provided plentiful opportunities for neighbors to become good friends. That’s exactly what happened around the Sunny Slope neighborhood. One evening in 1961, Shirley, Frank and other folks from the area got together at a neighbor’s – Dr. Fischer’s – house. Frank explained, “One time we were playing cards there and Shirley says, ‘I’m getting contractions.’ So Doc Fischer says, ‘Let’s go into the bedroom. I’ll check you out.’ So he says, ‘You’re ready to go. Let’s get out of here! Card game’s over!’” In case you’re wondering, Shirley and Dr. Fischer made it to the hospital for the delivery of their daughter Monica.

Several years later, a developer’s plan to build an apartment building on unimproved land at the end of Sunny Slope Lane stunned area residents. The property was zoned for single- and two-family homes and neighboring property owners overwhelmingly opposed changing it. Frank told me, “The developer persisted and brought it before the city council and asked for a vote from the city council as to whether he would be allowed to build apartments.”

The City Council agreed to rezone the property, without the required written consent of two-thirds of the residents living within 100 feet of the proposed apartments, The Council’s rezoning violated a City ordinance passed nearly 50 years prior.

Frank told me that got neighbors swiftly organized against the development. “Linn Firestone, at the top of the hill on Colvin, sent a petition around to the neighbors that were involved in the process and asked them if they’d they would contribute costs for him to take it to the Minnesota Supreme Court. It would cover his costs he wouldn’t charge for his (legal) services.

“All the neighbors donated the necessary funds and it was brought before the Supreme Court and they squashed the Saint Paul City Council decision to allow the apartments to be built.

“It made the papers. They called this area ‘the silk stocking neighborhood.’” Frank told me, laughing.

St. Paul Dispatch 122669-1

The article in the Saint Paul Dispatch newspaper reporting on the ruling by the Supreme Court of Minnesota on O’Brien et al., v. City of Saint Paul.

“There are cogent reasons why local owners are entitled to a voice in rezoning. They are the ones most vitally concerned; the usefulness and value of their property may be involved. When zones are established, citizens buy and improve property relying on the restrictions provided by law. They have a right to the permanency and security that the law should afford.”
From the Supreme Court of Minnesota opinion written by Justice James C. Otis and  issued December 26, 1969 on O’Brien et al., v. City of Saint Paul upholding a lower court ruling banning construction of apartments on Sunny Slope Lane

Shirley and Frank are wonderful people with colorful stories about their part of the City and I am delighted that our paths crossed.

From Sunny Slope Lane I took a zigzagging course to the entrance to the southern section of Hidden Falls Regional Park, where Prior Avenue meets Mississippi River Boulevard South.

The sun hovers above the horizon as viewed from the Hidden Falls Park entrance.

The sun hovers above the horizon as viewed from the Hidden Falls Park entrance.

The park wasn’t open for the season yet but that didn’t deter me from a quick trip in. The road into the park, officially called Lower Hidden Falls Drive, or Road (depending upon the map), descends under the Highway 5 bridge and coils back under in the opposite direction, ending at a parking lot a few tenths of a mile to the east.

Lower Hidden Falls Drive dips out of sight. Above, the Highway 5 bridge over the Mississippi River .

Lower Hidden Falls Drive dips out of sight. Above, the Highway 5 bridge over the Mississippi River.

All in all, Lower Hidden Falls Road presented me with a 200-plus foot drop in about a quarter mile. I elected to return the way I came to burn some of those winter calories.

The view up the bluff toward Mississippi River Boulevard from the Hidden Falls Park lot. Once the leaves fully cover the trees, it will be virtually impossible to see even halfway up the slope.

The view up the bluff toward Mississippi River Boulevard from the Hidden Falls Park parking lot. Once the leaves fully cover the trees, it will be virtually impossible to see even halfway up the slope.

The underbelly of the Highway 5 Bridge, looking south-southwest toward Fort Snelling.

The underbelly of the Highway 5 Bridge, looking south-southwest toward Fort Snelling.

Before I began the upward climb to Mississippi River Boulevard, I stopped under the Highway 5 bridge. There I noticed a couple of things that caused me some unease-a basketball-sized chunk of concrete and several rebar that obviously dropped from the bridge; and upon looking up at the bridge, a considerable space from which concrete had fallen.

Metal rebar and a section of concrete that dropped from the underside of the Highway 5 bridge.

Metal rebar and a section of concrete that dropped from the underside of the Highway 5 bridge.

As you can see, several large pieces of concrete fell from the subsurface of the bridge.

Looking up at the underside of the bridge, I could see where several large pieces of concrete had fallen.

Fortunately, MNDOT was less than a month from starting the obviously necessary re-decking of the bridge. I adjusted my helmet and quickly and carefully zipped under the bridge. I paused a final time in the park to watch a well-bundled boater fishing.

Hidden Falls 8

An early-season angler works the Mississippi between Hidden Falls Park in Saint Paul and Fort Snelling.

With that, back on the bike to scale Lower Hidden Falls Road to go home. (Full disclosure: I needed a couple of rest stops on the way up to the River Road so even with the indoor biking, I’ve got to get back in shape.) Although the color pallet consisted almost exclusively of greys and browns, the bare trees and hills allowed me to see some regular scenery in distinctly different ways.

Click on the link for the map of this ride: Garmin Connect.

Halloween, Hedges (because trees don’t alliterate) and Hydrants

12.5 Miles

Macalester-Groveland, Merriam Park, South Como

The warm October continued for another day, which gave me another chance to ride. Like yesterday, Halloween ornamentation and leaves were plentiful.

The golden leaves of the maple trees are set off magnificently by the deep blue sky.

The golden leaves of the maple trees are set off magnificently by the deep blue sky.

On my bike rides I often see an object I otherwise wouldn’t lay eyes on. Many times it’s the unusual, but occasionally, it’s objects so commonplace most of us go about our lives never noticing them, though they’re in plain sight. An example, which regular readers of this blog know, is my atypical interest in manhole covers. This ride I spent an unusual amount of time scrutinizing fire hydrants, the result of the stop at and research of the former Waterous Company building on my October 24th journey. Never before did I know fire hydrants came in so many sizes, shapes and colors.

Finn and Lincoln. The silver object on the left side of the hydrant is a spring which holds an orange and white flag pole approximately two feet tall. When a big snow storm hits, the flag lets firefighters and nearby residents know where a snow-buried hydrant is.

Finn and Lincoln. The silver object on the left side of the hydrant is a spring which holds an orange and white flag pole approximately two feet tall. When a big snow storm hits, the flag lets firefighters and nearby residents know where a snow-buried hydrant is.

This old hydrant at the corner of Cleveland and Dayton Avenues is likely from the mid-1940s.

This old hydrant at the corner of Cleveland and Dayton Avenues is likely from the mid-1940s.

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I did see more than fire hydrants on the ride.

The Interstate 94 sign on Cleveland and Wabash Avenues. Older signs like this one have the name of the state between the word “Interstate” and the number. Newer signs are generic, no longer carrying the state in which they sit.

The Interstate 94 sign on Cleveland and Wabash Avenues. Older signs like this one have the name of the state between the word “Interstate” and the number. Newer signs are generic, no longer baring the name of the state in which they sit.

That is the smokestack of Rock-Tenn’s cardboard recycling plant in the background.

That is the smokestack of Rock-Tenn’s cardboard recycling plant in the background.

This unusal and diminutive Pro Stop gas station has sat on the northwest corner of Clevleland and Wabash since 1947. Among its more curious traits is that it is two stories tall.

This unusual and diminutive Pro Stop gas station has sat on the northwest corner of Cleveland and Wabash since 1947. Among its more curious traits is that it is two stories tall.

A sign from days gone by says “Cliff’s Gas & O” which I’m guessing is oil. I have not been able to find any record of Cliff’s.

A sign from days gone by says “Cliff’s Gas & O” which I’m guessing is oil. I have not been able to find any record of Cliff’s.

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A brand new 2014 Waterous hydrant at Lafond Avenue and Fry Avenue. Unlike most of the other hydrants around town it doesn’t have yellow hose caps.

A brand new 2014 Waterous hydrant at Lafond Avenue and Fry Avenue. Unlike most of the other hydrants around town it doesn’t have yellow hose caps.

I didn’t know whether the different color schemes on the fire hydrants have a particular meaning so I called the Saint Paul Regional Water Services. Turns out, the color of the hydrant lets firefighters know the size of the water main feeding it. A Water Utility engineer told me the diameter of the mains range from one inch for old pipes to 42 inches for what is called a feeder main. Feeder mains, as the name suggests, move a great volume of water from one end of the city to the other. Those hydrants, painted red and white, are rare; I’ve not seen one.

The red with yellow hydrants are located in residential neighborhoods and are fed by six inch mains.

The all-red hydrants, also found among residences, are the new standard with greater capacity eight inch mains. And the red and green fire hydrants are fed by mains 12 to 36 inches in diameter. Those hydrants have greater pressure and capacity and are often used in areas with larger buildings, warehouses and factories.

This higher capacity hydrant is located at Oxford Street and Front Avenue, where there are stores and businesses on all four corners.

This higher capacity hydrant, with the green caps, is located at Oxford Street and Front Avenue, where there are stores and businesses on all four corners.

Other fun facts about Saint Paul’s fire hydrants:

  • The first hydrants were installed on Lafayette Road and Grove Street in downtown
  • Today there are nearly 10,000 hydrants in the City
  • Every one is inspected at least once a year.
  • Any hydrant not properly accessible, that doesn’t provide the proper flow rate or that leaks is repaired or replaced.(1)
  • The Saint Paul Regional Water Utility attempts to keep its hydrants in service for about 100 years! (2)
  • A hydrant is knocked over nearly every day in the Capitol City.
An obviously non-functioning hydrant.

An obviously non-functioning hydrant.

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Still on Lafond, ghosts fly about the nearly leafless tree at 1306 Lafond.)

At 1306 Lafond, ghosts fly about the nearly leafless tree.

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This sign sits on the boulevard of the house at 1076 Churchill Street at Orchard Avenue in Como.

This sign sits on the boulevard of the house at 1076 Churchill Street at Orchard Avenue in Como.

Como curb cleanup 5

Curb cleaning along Churchill Street.

True to the sign in her yard, Ginny diligently vacuumed up leaves from along the curbs in front of her house. The idea, said Ginny, is to reduce the algae growth in Como Lake by keeping plant matter out of the storm sewers. “I volunteered to do it because I walk around Como and so I see the result of what’s going on. Before I knew the problem I used to try to keep the leaves off the gutter anyway just because they eventually blow down to someone else’s yard or they blow into mine.”

A similar sign Ginny’s seen around the neighborhood encourages neighbors to adopt a storm drain. Again, the goal is to improve Como Lake’s water quality.

Como curb cleanup 3

I asked Ginny whether neighbors have commented on her sign. “I just put the sign up two days ago so hopefully it will make a little difference.”

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Churchill Street is interrupted by a pair of Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railroad tracks. Tank cars filled with Bakken oil are frequently on the southbound BNSF trains that pass by.

Churchill Street is interrupted by a pair of Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railroad tracks. Today so-called intermodal cars speed by. However, tank cars filled with Bakken oil are frequently on the southbound BNSF trains that pass by.

Caution-Churchill Street is also a Zombie Zone.

Be aware-Churchill Street is also a Zombie Zone.

A block east and to the south on Oxford are these (fraternal) twin garages.

A block east and to the south on Oxford are these (fraternal) twin garages.

The garage on the left has a cupola with a fun weather vane.

The garage on the right (south) has a cupola with a fun weather vane.

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991 North Oxford Street stands out from neighboring homes because of its uncommon stone construction and second story tablet between the two front windows. Research yielded little information about the home’s history. One early occupant, Joe Graus, is listed as a “washer” in the 1914 Polk City Directory

This unusual stone home was built in 1910 according to Ramsey County tax records…

This unusual stone home was built in 1910 according to Ramsey County tax records…

…and confirmed by the “cornerstone” of the house. Or visa versa.

…and confirmed by the “cornerstone” of the house. Or visa versa.

The north side of 993 Oxford Street. Note the two story porch in back.

The north side of 991 Oxford Street. Note the two story porch in back.

The exterior is uncommonly all stone, from the foundation to the roof, with the exception of the front porch. Curiously, the “J” on the “cornerstone” has been changed for some reason. It appears as if at one time it was a backward “J” that was corrected.

My research did not yield any information about who

My research did not yield any information about who “TJD” was.

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Frankenstein keeps watch on the unsuspecting from the second floor of 1636 Englewood Avenue, Merriam Park.

Frankenstein keeps watch on the unsuspecting from the second floor of 1636 Englewood Avenue, Merriam Park, at least through Halloween.

This link will take you to the map of the October 25, 2014 ride. Garmin Connect.

It came as no surprise that this ride was my last of 2014. For my blogging purposes, any ride after mid-October is a bonus, meaning I sneaked in two bonus rides in ’14! Of course I do not enjoy my winter biking hiatus-riding in place in the basement is decent exercise but exceedingly dull. Looking at it positively, I could be back biking streets of Saint Paul in five months, and the winter allows me to catch up on my blog posts.

More Discoveries Around the Airport

Friday, October 24, 2014   19 miles Macalester-Groveland, West End, Downtown, West Side  

The homeowners are not the victims of a Halloween prank. Rather, the house in the 1200 block of Jefferson is stripped to its skivvies in preparation for a rebuild that likely involves an expansion.

The homeowners are not the victims of a Halloween prank. Rather, the house in the 1200 block of Jefferson is stripped to its skivvies in preparation for a rebuild that likely involves an expansion.

Halloween is but a week away and there were some creative decorations displayed on today’s jaunt. The house at 1236 Jefferson is a great example.

Count Dracula, jack o’ lanterns, pumpkins and ghouls; this house has something for everyone on Halloween.

Count Dracula, jack o’ lanterns, pumpkins and ghouls; this house has something for everyone on Halloween.

Next stop for Halloween fun, 487 Michigan Street in the West End.

Only the bravest children venture here when darkness settles in.

Only the bravest children venture here when darkness settles in.

Next door at 879 Michigan is a G-rated display.

Next door, at 879 Michigan, it’s a G-rated display.

What’s an “oob”?

What’s an “oob”?

This impeccably dressed gentleman sits in one of the C.S.P.S. Hall  windows at 381-383 Michigan Street, at West 7th.)

No, this isn’t for Halloween. This impeccably dressed gentleman sits in one of the C.S.P.S. Hall windows at 381-383 Michigan Street, at West 7th.)

The Česko-SlovanskýPodporujícíSpole, C.S.P.S. Hall for short (and because few can pronounce the proper name), opened at 381-383 Michigan Street in 1887 as a Czech and Slovak social, cultural, educational and gymnastic organization. Businesses have been on the first floor since the C.S.P.S. Hall opened. Picha’s Saloon, an early tenant, served drinks from 1889 until about 1919.

C.S.P.S. Hall had a main floor grocery in 1976. Courtesy Minnesota Historical Society.

C.S.P.S. Hall had a main floor bakery in 1976. Courtesy Minnesota Historical Society.

A meat market moved in next, then grocery stores, bakeries, an Irish dance group, Lao Family Services in the ‘80s and a medical manufacturer. Since 2000, the space has been the German restaurant Glockenspiel. The building earned National Register of Historic Places status in 1977.

Women sewing at Lao Family Community Center in C.S.P.S. Hall,1983. Courtesy Minnesota Historical Society.

Women sewing at Lao Family Community Center in C.S.P.S. Hall,1983. Courtesy Minnesota Historical Society.

The sign for the hall hangs along West 7th Street.

The sign for the hall hangs along West 7th Street.

The Honorary Consulate of the Czech Republic, Robert E. Vanasek, has an office at C.S.P.S. Hall.

The Honorary Consulate of the Czech Republic, Robert E. Vanasek, has an office at C.S.P.S. Hall.

C.S.P.S. Hall is still serving the Czech and Slovak communities through festivals, language, dance and gymnastics classes and occasional public events. There is a great deal more to the history of the C.S.P.S. Hall on the Sokol Minnesota website at http://sokolmn.org/history/csps.htm

From C.S.P.S. Hall I rode into Downtown via West 7th, then turned south on Kellogg Boulevard, pausing for a look at the Mississippi River. This narrow, triangular strip of land is Kellogg Mall Park and affords one of the best views of the Mississippi River anywhere in Saint Paul. (It’s a prime spot to catch fireworks on the Fourth of July.)

Looking south, Shepard Road is in the foreground. Also visible is Raspberry Island, the Robert Street Bridge and an apartment building or condominium complex.

Looking south, Shepard Road is in the foreground. Also visible is Raspberry Island, the Robert Street Bridge and an apartment building or condominium complex.

Turning to the north, the view is Cedar Street toward the Capitol grounds. Buildings on the left side of Cedar include the Crowne Plaza Hotel banquet room and behind it, the Degree of Honor building. A parking ramp and the Minnesota Building are on the right side of Cedar. The fountain in front (drained in preparation for the cold weather) is one of a pair in Kellogg Mall Park.

Turning to the north, the view is Cedar Street toward the Capitol grounds. Buildings on the left side of Cedar include the Crowne Plaza Hotel banquet room and behind it, the Degree of Honor building. A parking ramp and the Minnesota Building are on the right side of Cedar. The fountain in front, drained in preparation for the cold weather, is one of a pair in Kellogg Mall Park.

A couple other sights of note in the park; First, a bas relief of the notorious Pig’s Eye Perrault is on one of the railing supports. Kellogg Park 3 I mention the second, a photo-wrapped traffic signal box, because the image on each side is effectively the view from that spot.

The signal box with the view south (left) and east along Kellogg (right.)

The signal box with the view south (left) and east along Kellogg (right.)

The image on the traffic signal box.

The image on the traffic signal box.

The scene as I shot it. Notice the old parking meters in the traffic signal box.

The scene as I shot it. Notice the old parking meters on the photo on the traffic signal box.

Earlier in 2014 I ventured to the Downtown Saint Paul Airport and explored Bayfield Avenue on the eastern edge of Holman Field.  Click here to read the July 19, 2014 ride. Today I’ve returned to go inside the airport terminal and then survey the facilities bordering the western side of the airport.

A single engine prop plane in its final approach to Holman Field. The fence in the forground keeps unwanted people and things off runways.

A single engine prop plane in its final approach to Holman Field. The fence in the foreground keeps unwanted people and things off runways.

A corporate jet taxis to its take off point. Gander Mountain, 3M, UnitedHealth Group and Conagra Foods are among the corporations that have jets at Holman Field. A couple of charter airlines fly in and out of Saint Paul too.

A corporate jet taxis to its take off point. Gander Mountain, 3M, UnitedHealth Group and Conagra Foods are among the corporations that have jets at Holman Field. A couple of charter airlines fly in and out of Saint Paul, too.

The exterior of the terminal building at Holman Field. I took this picture on my first visit earlier this year.

The exterior of the terminal building at Holman Field. I took this picture on my first visit earlier this year.

The interior of the terminal, which was closed on my first visit, is an odd mingling of original construction and updates completed over seven decades. To my admittedly untrained eye, most of the remodeling is an insult to this historic structure.

The terrazzo map of North America is the interior showpiece of the Saint Paul Downtown Airport terminal building.

The terrazzo map of North America is the interior showpiece of the Saint Paul Downtown Airport terminal building.

Saint Paul's vital statistics on the terrazo map.

Saint Paul’s vital statistics on the terrazzo map.

"St. Paul" is in larger type than "Minneapolis", as it should be.

“St. Paul” is in larger type than “Minneapolis”, as it should be.

Visitors can even grab a rental car at Holman Field.

Visitors can even grab a rental car at Holman Field.

The small waiting area features a collection of unmatched furniture.

The small waiting area features a collection of unmatched furniture.

The upstairs meeting area of the terminal, I imagine, lost most of its charm during remodeling.

The upstairs meeting area of the terminal, I imagine, lost most of its charm during remodeling.

This stairway between the main floor and offices on the second floor retains most of its original style.

This stairway between the main floor and offices on the second floor retains its original style.

Back outside I rode south along the dully named Airport Road. Technically a private thoroughfare, but open to the public, it’s the first time I’d ridden or driven here.

The Minnesota Army National Guard Aviation building is the closest to the terminal.

The Minnesota Army National Guard Aviation building is the closest to the terminal on the south road.

The 834th Aviation Support Battalion (ASB), according to the Minnesota National Guard website, provides logistics, transportation, medical, maintenance and communications support for the 34th Combat Aviation Brigade. The 834th ASB supports missions around Minnesota, the Midwest and in Iraq as part of Operation Iraqi Freedom.(1)

A National Guard fuel truck and storage lockers sit on the tarmac.

A National Guard fuel truck and storage lockers sit on the tarmac.

St. Paul Flight Center is a concierge service for people and aircraft that fly in and out of the Downtown Airport. (2)

St. Paul Flight Center is a concierge service for people and aircraft that fly in and out of the Downtown Airport. (2)

Airport Road dead-ends at Eaton Street while Eaton runs west off airport property and east and then south to other hangars and airport tenants.

 Airport Road meets Eaton Street.

Airport Road meets Eaton Street.

A sign shows of some of the tenants oin the southern part of the airport. Intriguingly, many tenants are not listed on this register and buildings and hangers lack any identification other than the address.

A sign shows of some of the tenants in the southern part of the airport. Intriguingly, many tenants are not listed on this register and buildings and hangers lack any identification other than the address.

I took the picture of 410 Airport Road from Eaton Street. It's one of many unmarked hangers at the airport.

I took the picture of 410 Airport Road from Eaton Street. It’s one of many unmarked hangers at the airport.

The humble State Patrol headquarters at Holman Field.

The humble State Patrol headquarters at Holman Field.

There’s been a Minnesota State Patrol Flight Section at Holman Field since 1957. Now, the State Patrol has nine state trooper pilots and three Bell helicopters equipped with thermal imagers and bright spot lights, although some of the equipment and pilots fly out of Brainerd. Four Cessna 182 airplanes and one Beechcraft Queen Air help with traffic enforcement and shuttling of prisoners.

This unmarked office and hanger building is reported to belong to UnitedHealth Care.

This unmarked office and hanger building is reported to belong to UnitedHealth Care.

Three more hangars marked only with numbers.

Three more hangars marked only with numbers.

This fence marks the end of the public area of the airport. Eaton Street continues south for at least a quarter of a mile. My speculation is that the gate and fence were added to improve security in the aftermath of the September 11th attacks.

This fence marks the end of the public area of the airport. Eaton Street continues south for at least a quarter of a mile. My speculation is that the gate and fence were added to improve security in the aftermath of the September 11th attacks.

One of two beacons that signal aircraft on the way into Holman Field.

One of two beacons that were built to signal aircraft on the way into Holman Field.

Looking west from Eaton Street, outside of airport property.

Looking west from Eaton Street at the wilderness outside of airport property.

The Saint Paul Downtown Airport is owned and operated by MAC, the Metropolitan Airports Commission (as are Twin Cities International and the so-called ‘feeder airports’ around Saint Paul-Minneapolis.) As you’d figure, it takes a whole lot of heavy equipment to keep the airport running properly, and much of it is kept in three buildings.

Three Metropolitan Airports Commission maintenance buildings are on the southeast side of Holman Field.

Three Metropolitan Airports Commission maintenance buildings are on the southeast side of Holman Field.

MAC vehicles used at Holman Field are repaired here.

MAC vehicles used at Holman Field are repaired here.

The 63 degree day isn’t fooling anyone. A snow plow destined to clear three runways and at least twice that many taxiways seems to be watching for the weather to turn.

The 63 degree day isn’t fooling anyone. A snow plow destined to clear three runways and at least twice that many taxiways seems to be watching for the weather to turn.

That’s a creative abbreviation for Frontage.

That’s a creative abbreviation for Frontage.

Back on Eaton I exited the airport and almost immediately came to the East Lafayette Frontage Road and the southern part of the Riverview Business Center. A good portion of the West Side Flats are part of Riverview, which opened in 1962.(3)

Riverview is one of about 20 Port Authority projects around Saint Paul.

Riverview is one of about 20 Port Authority projects around Saint Paul.

The Port Authority returns underdeveloped land, often times polluted by long-gone manufacturers, to a condition where it can be leased or sold for redevelopment.

Legacy Funeral Home at 255 Eaton Street primarily serves the Hmong community. The two chapels are in a building that was once an bingo parlor.

Legacy Funeral Home at 255 Eaton Street primarily serves the Hmong community. The two chapels are in a building that was once an bingo parlor.

This is one of Legacy’s two chapels in the building.

This is one of Legacy’s two chapels in the building.

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Saint Paul has been a railroad town for more than 120 years. Although the names have changed, several railroads have major facilities in town, including switching yards, offices and maintenance shops. Union Pacific is a relative newcomer to our city, officially arriving with the 1995 purchase of the Chicago & North Western Railroad.

Union Pacific Railroad maintenance trucks are kept at this shop.

Union Pacific Railroad maintenance trucks are kept at this shop.

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Speaking of maintenance, the ubiquitous white and blue mail trucks need work now and then and here’s the one spot in the east metro where it is done.

The Riverview Vehicle Maintenance Facility at 292 Eva Street.

The Riverview Vehicle Maintenance Facility at 292 Eva Street.

Karl Loberg lowers a mail vehicle he hauled in on his tow truck.

Carl Loberg lowers a mail vehicle he hauled in on his tow truck.

Carl Loberg, a Level 9 Lead Technician, works second shift at Riverview Vehicle Maintenance Facility (VMF.) Carl has worked for the postal service for more than two years after many years as a mechanic, mostly at Twin Cities-area car delaers. Carl much prefers working for the postal service. “They work real well with you here to teach you how to do it so you can repair practically anything. They always say a safe and reliable vehicle is what they want.”

Four LLVs (Long-Life Vehicles) sit on lifts at the Riverview Vehicle Maintenance Facility.

LLVs (Long-Life Vehicles) sit on four of the 10 lifts at the Riverview Vehicle Maintenance Facility.

Carl added, “In the dealerships you’re tracked on how much you do and you’re on a commission basis so the more work you do the more you get paid. Here it’s fix it right, get it right.”

Carl starts an LLV and drives it into a service bay for repair.

Carl readies an LLV for the short drive into a service bay for repair.

Carl told me the Riverview VMF keeps about 6,000 US Postal Service vehicles running. A good deal of the work the mechanics do is a twice-yearly “once over”, which includes a full inspection, oil change, brakes, tires and tune up.

The Riverview VMH repairs primarily three varieties of postal vehicles. The most common, the white mail delivery vehicle we’ve seen seemingly forever, is known as the ‘Long-Life Vehicle,’ or LLV. “They’re from ’87 to ’94 or ’95; with 205s (cubic inch engine) in them,” said Carl. “What’s nice about ‘em is they’re very repairable compared to the newer cars, which are a lot more involved, a lot more technical. For these, they get used so much they’re very easy to maintain and economical to maintain.”

The other vehicles frequently serviced by Carl and the other mechanics are 2002 Ford Explorers called FFVs, (Flex Fuel Vehicles), and 2002 Dodge Caravans.

An LLV on the lift at the VMF.

An LLV on the lift at the VMF.

The VMF isn’t the only place mechanics repair postal service vehicles. There are times mechanics take road trips. “If they have an issue with a taillight out, little things, we’ll go out there, we’ll take a truck full of parts and we’ll stop at these stations (post offices).”

There is enough repair work to keep three shifts of mechanics busy. Occasionally, however, they squeeze in a little fun. Carl told me about the time another mechanic replaced an engine in a USPS vehicle. “…he was all proud he got it running. I came around the back side of the truck and I started tapping on the frame with a big old hammer. So he kinda shuffled around a little bit and walked toward the key to turn it off because it was knocking real bad. I stopped knocking and he walked back to the front and he could relax a little bit and I started hammering on it again.” After tapping several more times Carl admitted to the prank and he and the other mechanics had a good laugh.

Another way Carl occasionally lightens things up is by playing tunes with his tools. “I’ll play my wrenches because if you lay ‘em out, if you tap on ‘em they’ve got different tones. So I can play a few different songs; “Mary Had a Little Lamb”, “Jingle Bells”, stuff like that.”

I left the Riverview VMF with an appreciation of the volume of work postal service mechanics do as well as Carl’s creativity, both with practical jokes and musical performance.

_

The last of the old Waterous Company’s Saint Paul plant goes almost unnoticed on a six square chunk of land on the West End Flats. The property is bounded on the north by Fillmore Avenue, Livingston Street to the east, Plato Boulevard on the south and to the west by railroad tracks.

The last of the old Waterous Company’s Saint Paul plant goes almost unnoticed on a six square block chunk of land on the West End Flats. The property is bounded on the north by Fillmore Avenue, Livingston Street to the east, Plato Boulevard on the south and to the west by railroad tracks.

This decaying building is in a slow, steady but ultimately unwinnable struggle against trespassers, time and the incessant assault of Minnesota’s seasons. Visible mainly thanks to fall’s onset and the die back of foliage, the last of the Waterous Company’s Saint Paul factory shares a piece of land about six square blocks with nothing but weeds, trees and dirt. Waterous shuttered this building and the rest of the plant in 1974 after completing construction of a modern plant several miles away in South St. Paul.

The Waterous Company hasn’t operated in this building since 1974. But the company, in South St. Paul, is doing well, still manufacturing fire hydrants.

The Waterous Company hasn’t operated in this building since 1974. But the company, in South St. Paul, is doing well, still manufacturing fire hydrants.

To my surprise, the Waterous Company’s name only coincidentally relates to fire hydrants, its best known product. The company, in Winnipeg, Manitoba at the time, had been called P.C. Van Brocklin Foundry until 1877, when Charles Waterous renamed it Waterous Engine Works Company. Twin sons Fred and Frank Waterous moved the company to South St. Paul where it manufactured steam engines and hydrants for fighting fires. (3)

The December 1908 edition of Gas Review magazine featured an advertisement for a Waterous gasoline powered fire engine. Courtesy www.VintageMachinery.org and Tractor & Gas Engine Review.

The December 1908 edition of Gas Review magazine featured an advertisement for a Waterous gasoline powered fire engine. Courtesy http://www.VintageMachinery.org and Tractor & Gas Engine Review.

A disastrous blaze in 1894 burned the Waterous factory in South St. Paul to the ground. Insurance helped the company rebuild-in Saint Paul at 80 Fillmore Avenue.

The Waterous Company's plant on Fillmore Avenue circa 1960. Courtesy Minnesota Historical Society.

The Waterous Company’s plant on Fillmore Avenue circa 1960. Courtesy Minnesota Historical Society.

Waterous fabricated hydrants and other fire suppression equipment at the Fillmore Avenue plant until 1974, when it moved back to South St. Paul.

IMG_8685

A loading dock door shows signs of graffiti, while vegetation encroaches on the old Waterous building.

A close look at the building's only identifier.

A close look at the building’s only identifier.

The changing leaves on a couple of nearby bushes added vivid dashes of red, orange and yellow around the former Waterous plant.

waterous 7waterous 8

Once the site of many industrial and storage facilities, some manufacturing remains on the West Side Flats. This 3M plant operates at 42 West Water Street. (4)

3M has a pharmaceutical pilot plant on Water Street, a couple blocks south of the former Waterous facility.

3M has a pharmaceutical pilot plant on Water Street, a couple blocks south of the former Waterous facility.

Nearby the maple trees burst with yellow and orange.

Nearby the maple trees burst with yellow and orange.

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The five story Farwell, Ozmun, Kirk & Company Warehouse 2 opened in 1911 at 106 West Water Street. Four years later, the hardware manufacturer/wholesaler added a sixth floor. The breadth of F.O.K. inventory was extensive-from the everyday-tools and paint to the unusual-oil burners and harnesses and poultry supplies.

The five story Farwell, Ozmun, Kirk & Company Warehouse 2 opened in 1911 at 106 West Water Street. Just four years later, the hardware manufacturer/wholesaler added a sixth floor to the building. The breadth of F.O.K. inventory was extensive-from everyday objects like tools and paint to the unusual-oil burning lamps, harnesses and poultry supplies.

Railroad tracks that used to bring the various products to and from the F.O.K. building are nearly hidden after going unused for decades.

Railroad tracks that used to bring the various products to and from the F.O.K. building are nearly hidden after going unused for decades.

F.O.K. Warehouse 2 is now called ACVR Warehouse and counts among its tenants artists, musicians, a wine importer/distributor and other small businesses. OK Hardware Stores, while not to my knowledge around the Twin Cities, grew out of F.O.K.

The signpost at the corner of Water Street and Plato Boulevard.

The signpost at the corner of Water Street and Plato Boulevard.

Nearby is a small public charter school called River’s Edge Academy, a high school with about 100 students. The outdoors-focused River’s Edge Academy partners with organizations including Audubon Center of the North Woods, National Park Service, Dodge Nature Center and Urban Boat Builders.

Nearby is a small public charter school called River’s Edge Academy, a high school with about 100 students. The outdoors-focused River’s Edge Academy partners with organizations including Audubon Center of the North Woods, National Park Service, Dodge Nature Center and Urban Boat Builders.

_

Less than two blocks east of River’s Edge is the Plato Building, notable (infamous perhaps?) because Ramsey County’s Property Records and Revenue Department and several other county divisions office here.

Less than two blocks east of River’s Edge is the Plato Building, notable (infamous perhaps) because Ramsey County’s Property Records and Revenue Department and several other county divisions office here.

_

The sun sets about 6:30 at the end of October and so at 6:10, the time had come to depart for home. I had to ride up a good sized hill no matter which route I chose so I opted for the Wabasha Avenue bridge to catch sundown. I wasn’t disappointed.

The fading sunlight lends an orange tint to the Mississippi River and the Minnesota Centennial Showboat, left. The Smith Avenue High Bridge is in the middle of the picture.

The fading sunlight lends an orange tint to the Mississippi River and the Minnesota Centennial Showboat, left. The Smith Avenue High Bridge is in the middle of the picture.

High tension power lines and towers appear to stand among waves of fire.

High tension power lines and towers appear to stand among waves of fire.

The colorful spectacle continued beyond both sunset and the Wabasha Avenue Bridge.

The railroad tracks immediately north of Grace Street at Oneida Street reflect the brilliant orange, yellow and purple cast by the sky.

The railroad tracks immediately north of Grace Street at Oneida Street reflect the brilliant orange, yellow and purple cast by the sky.

The spectacular sunset and aftermath were the perfect end of a remarkable and unexpected late October day on the bike.

To see the route of this ride, click here: https://connect.garmin.com/modern/activity/619260366

I Thought I Heard Goats

Saturday, September 27, 2014

Frogtown, Como, Highland Park     13.77 miles

St. Columba 1

The gorgeous Church of St. Columba,1327 Lafond Avenue, is a Frogtown landmark

The stunning September weather continued for another weekend, bringing enough sun and warmth to almost blot out thoughts of putting my bike away for the season. The points of interest started in Frogtown with the Church of Saint Columba, the iconic Catholic church on Lafond Street. I usually favor the architecture of older, traditional churches but the design and construction of Saint Columba are superb. The distinctive cylindrical spire topped with a silver cross seems to keep watch over the neighborhood. Although not apparent from the ground, Saint Columba is shaped much like a fish.(1) The more you look, the more you see all that makes this church so special.

The steel doors and above them, the stunning gold lettering are strongly set off by the white stone building

The steel doors and above them, the stunning gold lettering are strongly set off by the white stone of the building.

The cornerstone is in Latin.

The cornerstone is in Latin.

The curved chapel is the largest feature of the east side of the church.

The curved chapel is the largest feature of the east side of the church.

Another set of doors, on the east side of the church.

Another set of doors, on the east side of the church.

Windows about two-thirds of the way up the spire.

Windows about two-thirds of the way up the spire.

The cross atop the spire at Saint Columba.

The cross atop the spire at Saint Columba.

I did not go into Saint Columba but all accounts and photos I’ve seen indicate the unique architecture and beauty continue inside.

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The stone United Church of God in Christ is also on Lafond, at Lexington.

The stone United Church of God in Christ is also on Lafond, at Lexington.

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Confusingly, this entrance faces Lexington Parkway, despite the Energy Park address .

Confusingly, this entrance faces Lexington Parkway, despite the Energy Park address.

If you are unhappy with your internet speed (who isn’t?) and concerned about your safety and security and that of your belongings, this building is perfect for you. Officially known as “St. Paul STP-1125 Data Center”, the 113,000 square foot building includes multiple fiber optic providers (super fast Internet!), a large conferencing room, large fitness center next to showers and lockers, office and warehouse space.(3) Not only that, there are as many as 60 indoor parking spots, so there’s more than enough room for you, your family and one hundred of your closest friends or family.

Most recently the building housed a MISO (Midcontinent Independent System Operator) data center, an independent, not-for-profit regional transmission organization responsible for maintaining reliable transmission of power in 15 U.S. states and one Canadian province.(4)

A very serious security fence lines the entire building perimeter.

A very serious security fence lines the entire building perimeter.

A peek between the fencing shows two large, semi-mounted generators ready in case the power goes. Never again will a pesky thunderstorm interrupt your Internet surfing or Netlix.

A peek between the fencing shows two large, semi-mounted generators ready in case the power goes. Never again will a pesky thunderstorm interrupt your Internet surfing or Netflix.

The wonderful back yard of the Karl Wessel Home, 1285 West Como Boulevard.

The wonderful back yard and the back of the Karl Wessel Home, 1285 West Como Boulevard.

Churchill Street, a one-way thoroughfare very near Como Park and Como Lake features some beautiful homes. The largest, which I would call an estate, faces east so the back yard is on Churchill and the house is on Como Boulevard, facing east. The extraordinarily sculpted landscaping and backyard structures made me feel as if I was transported back to the Victorian Era. The home, built in 1902, is known as the Karl Wessel residence.

A long-standing wrought iron fence discourages uninvited guests from enjoying the back yard.

A long-standing wrought iron fence beautifies the neighborhood and discourages uninvited guests from enjoying the back yard.

Peeking through a decorative wrought iron circle on the fence I got a unusual view of the sidewalk between the house and the back yard. The vines hanging on a large pergola confirm it’s autumn.

Peeking through a decorative wrought iron circle on the fence I got a unusual view of the sidewalk between the house and the back yard. The vines hanging on a large pergola confirm it’s autumn.

The size and character of the home becomes apparent when viewed from the side (the north.)

The size and character of the home is apparent when viewed from the side (the north.)

Before I moved on to the front of the Wessel House, I turned to the north and took a few steps across Churchill Street, just into Como Park, to examine an unconventional memorial.

The torpedo was donated by the U.S. Submarine Veterans of World War II in 1965 as a remembrance of those who died aboard subs during that war.(5) A plaque on one side of the memorial lists all who died aboard the USS Swordfish. The other plaque names the 52 U.S. subs lost during World War II.

The torpedo was donated by the U.S. Submarine Veterans of World War II in 1965 as a remembrance of those who died aboard subs during that war.(5) A plaque on one side of the memorial lists all who died aboard the USS Swordfish. The other plaque names the 52 U.S. subs lost during World War II.

torpedo memorial 2torpedo memorial 1

The distinctive wrap-around porch and a turret, the two most interesting features of the Wessel House, came into view as I got close to the front.

The freshly remodeled Karl Wessel House looks very similar from the front as it did in 1905, about three years after being built for $10,000.

The freshly remodeled Karl Wessel House looks very similar from the front as it did in 1905, about three years after being built for $10,000.

Wessle house 1905. Courtesy Minnesota Historical Society.

Wessle house 1905. Courtesy Minnesota Historical Society.

Karl Wessel was an inventor on top of being an architect. His more intriguing inventions include 1902’s “Mattress-Filling Machine”, a “Briquet Machine” from 1906 and two years later, a “Machine for Making Ice Cream Cones.”

A patent diagram of Karl Wessel's Briquet Machine.

A patent diagram of Karl Wessel’s Briquet Machine.

Como Lake and walking and bike paths are on the opposite side of West Como Boulevard.

Como Lake and walking and bike paths are on the opposite side of West Como Boulevard.

There are close to a dozen Victorian-era homes along Como Boulevard. While none are bigger than the Wessel House, nearly all have been restored to their original glory, or at least updated.

In the 1880s, 52 acres of land in this area made up the railroad suburb of Warrendale. One of the developers, Cary I. Warren, lived at 1265 West Como Boulevard.

The Cary I. Warren residence, 1265 West Como, circa 1888. Courtesy Minnesota Historical Society.

The Cary I. Warren residence, 1265 West Como, circa 1888. Courtesy Minnesota Historical Society.

Although significantly remodeled, 1265 Como remains much much of its original Victorian style.

Although significantly remodeled, 1265 Como remains much much of its original Victorian style.

Horton marks the end of West Como Boulevard and the string of Victorian homes.

Horton marks the end of West Como Boulevard and the string of Victorian homes.

On a number of rides I’ve come across someone worthy of a story and interview but the resident or business owner isn’t available. Occasionally I’ve visited two or three times with no luck, so in those cases I’ll make an appointment. That’s the situation today; I have an appointment in Highland Park, so I’m off to Lexington Parkway to go south.

Central Lutheran School, formed by the merger of several Lutheran schools, opened here in 1951. A predecessor school goes back to 1861, just after Minnesota became a state.(6))

Central Lutheran School, formed by the merger of several Lutheran schools, opened here in 1951. A predecessor school goes back to 1861, just after Minnesota became a state.(7))

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Painter Kerry Koenker checks his work above the intersection of Lexington and Thomas.

Painter Kerry Koenker checks his work above the intersection of Lexington and Thomas.

Continuing southward on Lexington, I stopped for a red light at Thomas Avenue. There, in a bucket truck some 20 feet above the street, stood a painter putting a new coat of paint on the stoplight.

painter kerry 2

After a few minutes Kerry Koenker finished one light and pole and moved his truck to the east side of the intersection. The first question I asked Kerry was how he likes painting traffic signals for a living. “I love what I do! I get to be outside. I work hard so I stay in pretty decent shape. The money’s real good.”

Kerry been a “vested union journeyman aerial industrial painter” (that’s his official title) for 25 years. He’s worked for Aerial Painting Inc. for all but about two of those years.

Kerry uses different rollers and brushes depending upon what he's painting.

Kerry uses different rollers and brushes depending upon what he’s painting.

I was surprised to learn that Kerry spent four years at Saint Paul Technical College learning the trade. “Then after the four years you also have to work 6,000 hours to work your way up to journeyman (pay) scale, which is the highest scale.”

Kerry told me it takes him about seven hours to prep and paint one traffic signal like these at Lexington and Thomas. “First of all, we’ll pressure wash the poles and then prime them and then you gotta paint them. We’ll paint the stanchions (vertical post), the heads (stoplight), the pipes, the mast arm, the illuminator, the bases and the buttons. We’ll paint them all.”

Occasionally Kerry is able to get out of the bucket to paint with both feet on the ground.

Occasionally Kerry is able to get out of the bucket to paint with both feet on the ground.

When I asked Kerry whether painting traffic lights is dangerous he answered with a quick and firm, “Very. When we go to do the mast arms we have to literally park in the middle of this busy road; because wherever there are lights, that means inherently it’s busy. So I have to park on the main drag there (Lexington) and then you also have a good chance of being rear-ended.”

Kerry works on the traffic light overhanging Lexington. The only place he can park the bucket truck is in the street.

Kerry works on the traffic light overhanging Lexington. The only place he can park the bucket truck is in the street.

I’ll be right here working on that side of the pole and the traffic comes by and if they’re not careful and I’m not careful, I’m dead.”    Kerry Koenker

Kerry told me about his closest call, which came about when he was painting lights on a freeway exit. A man in a large van drove between Kerry’s truck and a pole Kerry was painting. The van glanced off Kerry’s truck and the pole and crashed. “When the cop came, he’s here talking to me and I said, ‘Do you think if that van had rear-ended me it would have killed me?” And he says, ‘No, I don’t think it would have killed you, I know it would.’”

It was surreal. I couldn’t believe how lucky I was not to be killed.”

Kerry found out later the driver of the van lost control of the vehicle because he suffered a heart attack.

Spray paint is Kerry's tool of choice for the signal shades.

Spray paint is Kerry’s tool of choice for the signal shades.

Aerial Painting Inc. is one of the very few companies in the Metro area doing this specialized painting so Kerry and his bucket truck are occupied spring to fall.

painter kerry 8

My unexpected and captivating visit with Kerry put me about 40 late for my appointment in Highland. Shortly before 3 p.m. I arrived at Luke and Hal’s.

The sound of a barking dog is common; the occasional cat’s meow routine; a chicken cluck infrequent; and most never hear the bleat of goats in Saint Paul-unless you’re near the intersection of Lexington and Juno Street. Lucas (Luke) Clapp and his dad, Hal, have been raising Nigerian Dwarf goats in their backyard at 1086 Juno Avenue for about a year and a-half. Charlotte and Luna are both females that the Clapps bought from a breeder in Orr, Minn.

Lucas (Luke) Clapp, left, pets Luna and holds a container of goat milk. On the right, Luke's dad Hal, holds onto Charlotte.

Lucas (Luke) Clapp, left, pets Luna and holds a container of goat milk. On the right, Luke’s dad Hal, holds onto Charlotte.

“Of course they were in the house for a while with the kids and on the sofas…” Hal said. The goats moved out of the house as soon as Hal built them a barn.

One of the two rooms in the goat barn Hal and Luke built.

One of the two rooms in the goat barn Hal and Luke built.

According to Hal, “What really got us started was Lucas being involved in Future Farmers of America with Highland (Park) High. It’s pretty unique for a metro school to have that program, but they’ve had it for quite some time.”

Luna and Charlotte watch me take a picture of the Clapp's backyard.

Luna and Charlotte go about their business as I take a picture of the Clapp’s backyard.

Prior to the goats, the Clapps had chickens and bees, so unusual pets is normal for them.

Believe it or not, goats and many other hoofed animals are legal to keep in Saint Paul and according to Hal, it’s easy to get the necessary permit, “The City of Saint Paul is pretty flexible on that as long as you have the neighbors’ permission and you’ve got the right sort of space for the animals.”

Luna steps into the barn for some water.

Luna steps into the barn for some water.

Charlotte and Luna are energetic but the Clapp’s backyard has mellowed significantly since spring when Charlotte and Luna gave birth to five kids between them. Luke and Hal sold the kids through an ad on Craig’s List.

The does are more than pets. “One of the things that we said, and he (Luke) agrees with, is if we’re going to have animals they’re going to have to produce something,” Hal told me. “So we have two beehives, the chickens and the goats and I have goat milk in the refrigerator right now.” Hal said he’s about ready to take his first shot at making chèvre (French for goat cheese.)

“People come over all the time; you’ll hear them; they’ll be like, ‘I thought I heard goats!’ ‘Yeah, yeah, you did.”   Hal Clapp on what he overhears people in the parking lot of the nearby Trader Joe’s say.

I asked Luke whether the goats are social. “I didn’t realize how much of a personality they would have and how much they’re like dogs in a lot of ways. They really like people. I thought it would take some training to get them to like people. At first they were a little skittish but almost immediately they warm up to you a lot.”

Charlotte looks for something to eat.

Charlotte looks for something to eat.

Luke told me that like a dog, he tried to take Luna and Charlotte for walks a few times. “One time I had them on a leash and I let them off ‘cause I thought, ‘OK, they’re interested in food.’ They turned around and just sprinted across Lexington and just right home. They wanted to be back.”

Hal mentioned that each goat has a unique personality. “This one (Charlotte) is super, super headstrong and really smart. When I get them on the milking stand and Luna will jump right up and Charlotte will be, ‘I know where this is going. I don’t care how hungry I’m not going up there.’”

Luna, left, and Charlotte investigate my camera.

Luna, left, and Charlotte investigate my camera.

According to Hal, the goats enjoy the backyard. “They’re kind of free range; they’ve been pretty good about staying in their pen but they get kind of noisy and they like to be out. They’ll lounge around in these chairs. They will eat anything they want to, pretty much. So I used to have a pretty nice flower garden back in here around the rain garden…”

Mmmm. Bark.

Mmmm. Bark.

I figure the missing leaves on the shrubs and hedges were the result of two hungry goats, not the autumn weather.

Epilogue: Monday, May 4, 2015

By happenstance, I saw Hal Clapp this weekend and asked how Luna and Charlotte did over the winter. Hal said he and Luke agreed to sell the goats to a farmer before the worst of winter hit to spare both humans and goats hassles of the cold and snow. Hal added that they retain visitation rights.

Click on the following link to see the route of today’s ride: http://www.mapmyride.com/workout/966476039

Footnotes

(1) Church of Saint Columba website, http://turnerscross.com/architecture/barry-byrne/church-of-st-columba-st-paul-minnesota-1949/

(2) Franciscan Brothers of Peace website, http://www.brothersofpeace.org/index.php/faq-sp-442588529

(3) CBRE Digital Realty website, http://www.cbre.us/o/minneapolis/AssetLibrary/1125EnergyParkDrive_InteractiveBrochure_v03_SH%5B3%5D.pdf

(4) MISO website, https://www.misoenergy.org/AboutUs/Pages/MISOFAQ.aspx

(5) page 2, Como Park History Tour: Part 1, http://www.district10comopark.org/uploads/Como+Park+History+Tour+Short+Version+for+D10_2.pdf

(6) p15 The Improvement Bulletin, Oct. 11, 1902

(7) Central Lutheran School website, http://www.clssp.org/history.cfm

On the Edge of Downtown

Macalester-Groveland, West End, Downtown
13.4 Miles
September 20, 2014

It's a buyers market today in Macalester-Groveland.

It’s a buyers market today in Macalester-Groveland.

There are sales galore in Mac-Groveland on this beautiful Saturday.
I made two stops on the same block of Palace Avenue in Mac-Groveland today, both for ornamentation so unusual they could (and may still) be recognized on the “Quirky Saint Paul” page of this blog. First, at 1366 Palace, these two pirate penguins stand guard.

Pirate penguins or penguin pirates? You tell me.

Pirate penguins or penguin pirates? You tell me.

Pirate penguins 2

Ahoy!

Then on the boulevard of 1360 Palace, a tree home for a small mammal or elf.

Could this be the home of the famous Keebler® elves?

Could this be the home of the famous Keebler® elves?

There’s even lawn furniture and a mailbox for the occupants.

There’s even lawn furniture and a mailbox for the occupants.

West End

Today the Schneider-Bolera House is back in

Today the Schneider-Bulera House is back in “like new” condition.

Fast forward to the West End and the historic Schneider-Bulera House at 365 Michigan Street. There is a sizable amount of debate about the history of the Schneider-Bulera House, with most of the disagreement about the home’s age. At one time local historians thought it could be the oldest surviving residential dwelling in Saint Paul but additional research changed that. Now, prevailing opinion is that it is one of Saint Paul’s older homes. The Ramsey County Tax and Property look up website gives an 1865 construction date for the house, with which the owner obviously disagrees.
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I haven’t dug up the full story but the Schneider-Bulera House fell into disrepair and prior to the most recent improvements, was in sad condition.

This is how the Schenieder-Bulera House looked in 2001. Courtesy Dick ??? and MnHS)

This is how the Schneider-Bulera House looked in 2001. Courtesy Dick Anderson and MnHS)

This part of the West End, officially called Winslow’s Addition, has quite a number of older homes, most dating back to 1880 or later. Only 369 Michigan, immediately west of the Schneider-Bulera House, comes close to the same age. Again, according to Ramsey County records, 1870 is the construction date of 369 Michigan.

Hmong archives 1

This brick home at 343 Michigan Avenue has been here for an estimate 135 years.

Several doors to the east, is this brick house, built in 1880. Quite obviously the difference in style and construction material between this home and the Schneider-Bulera House is significant. No longer a single family home, the tree-shrouded 343 Michigan Avenue is the Hmong Archives, a collection of close to 111,000 artifacts.(2) Yuepheng Xiong founded the Hmong archives in 1999 and moved it to 343 Michigan in 2010. The Hmong Archives is open to the public both during regularly scheduled hours and by appointment.

You might want to call before you go to the archives. I stopped three times and never found it open.

You might want to call before you go to the archives. I stopped three times and never found it open.

Dousman Park is half-acre space at Dousman and Goodhue Streets with a small playground.

Dousman Park is half-acre space at Dousman and Goodhue Streets with a small playground.

Downtown – A quick Visit
It’s less than a mile from Dousman Park on the West End to West 7th Street and Kellogg Boulevard Downtown. From there, the layout of some Downtown streets range from puzzling to confounding to mystifying, depending upon your experience and need to find an address.

West 7th Street intersects West 6th, Old 6th and West 5th. North is at the top of the map. Courtesy google.

West 7th Street intersects West 6th, Old 6th and West 5th. North is at the top of the map. Courtesy google.

For instance, West 7th crosses Kellogg, then West 5th, and West 6th/Old West 6th Streets.

One of several Catholic Charities buildings in this part of Downtown is at the corner of Old 6th Street and Main Street.

One of several Catholic Charities buildings in this part of Downtown is at the corner of Old 6th Street and Main Street.

To blur maters more, south of this intersection Main Street becomes Smith Avenue.

To blur matters more, south of this intersection Main Street becomes Smith Avenue.

Several businesses including a credit union and a couple of union headquarters are in the Labor & Professional Centre. This corner is expected to change considerably this summer when construction begins on Catholic Charities replacement for the Dorothy Day Center. The new emergency housing facility will have some 280 beds and close to 200 living units. (4)

Several businesses including a credit union and a couple of union headquarters are in the Labor & Professional Centre. This corner is expected to change considerably this summer when construction begins on Catholic Charities replacement for the Dorothy Day Center. The new emergency housing facility will have some 280 beds and close to 200 living units. (4)

Main Street isn’t; not even close. This picture is looking north from Old 6th Street and Main. The white object at the far end of Main Street is a “decorative” wall for the I-35E/I-94 commons.

Main Street isn’t. And not even close. This picture is looking north from Old 6th Street and Main. The white object at the far end of Main Street is a “decorative” wall for the I-35E/I-94 commons.

Mary Hall, Catholic Charities' rooming house for the homeless.

Mary Hall, a Catholic Charities’ shelter for the homeless.

Catholic Charities owns and operates Mary Hall, a homeless shelter for adults. Built in 1925 or ’26 by St. Joseph’s Hospital, it offered, “a private room and ample accommodations” for more than 200 of its nursing students.

Nurses gathered outside their dorm in 1953.

Nurses gathered outside their dorm in 1953. Look at those hats! Photo courtesy Minnesota Historical Society.

Today the entrance looks much the same.

Today the entrance looks much the same.

The one reminder I found of the Mary Hall’s original use is above the main entrance.

The one reminder I found of the Mary Hall’s original use is above the main entrance.

Continuing northbound on Main Street I waded through the St. Joseph’s Hospital campus.

St. Joe’s parking ramp doubles as a billboard for the hospital.

St. Joe’s parking ramp doubles as a billboard for the hospital.

 Now in the midst of the St. Joe’s Hospital campus at 10th Street at Main and looking east. The emergency room is in the foreground and the twin spires in the background belong to Assumption Church and behind it, Travelers Insurance headquarters.

Now in the midst of the St. Joe’s Hospital campus at 10th Street at Main and looking east. The emergency room is in the foreground, the twin spires in the background belong to Assumption Church and behind it, Travelers Insurance headquarters.

From 10th Street I turned south on to St. Peter Street and caught site of the 20 story Gallery Tower building The dull but inoffensive structure has more than 190 condos and first floor office space.

From 10th Street I turned south on to St. Peter Street and caught site of the 20 story Gallery Tower building The dull but inoffensive structure has more than 190 condos and first floor office space.

Looking north on St. Peter Street toward the Capitol grounds. Gallery Tower is on the right.

Looking north on St. Peter Street toward the Capitol grounds. Gallery Tower is on the right behind the skyway.

7th, old 9th and st. peter

Today it’s the intersection St. Peter and West 7th Street but for many years this was 9th Street and 7th Street was two blocks south of here, hence the small Old 9th Street sign.

In 1956 and beyond, Saint Paul's Greyhound Bus Depot occupied the corner of St. Peter and 9th Streets.

In 1956, Saint Paul’s Greyhound Bus Depot occupied the corner of St. Peter and 9th Streets. Today the depot is long gone and so is 9th street.

The Ramsey county Juvenile Detention Center replaced the Greyhound Bus depot on the northeast corner of St. Peter and West 7th street (aka Old 9th Street.)

The Ramsey County Juvenile Detention Center opened in the 2000s on the same spot the Greyhound Bus depot stood; the northeast corner of St. Peter and West 7th street (a.k.a. Old 9th Street.)

A couple doors south of West 7th is one of Saint Paul’s most recognized but puzzling establishments. The Original Coney Island Café and Tavern at 444-448 St. Peter Street opened in 1923 and over the subsequent 90-plus years, grew into a Downtown icon. For all practical purposes, the restaurant closed in 1994 when co-founder Frances Arvanitis got sick. After her death, her three children took ownership and open the café now and again for special events.(6) The Coney Island can also be rented for private parties.

The Coney Island Cafe' and Tavern occupy two neighboring buildings.

The Coney Island Cafe’ and Tavern occupy two neighboring buildings.

coney island 2

This building, 448 St. Peter, is the oldest non-residential building in Saint Paul and Minneapolis still in the spot where it was built. (7)

This building, 448 St. Peter, is the oldest non-residential building in Saint Paul and Minneapolis still in the spot where it was built. (7)

A better look at 444 St. Peter Street.

A better look at 444 St. Peter Street.

Heading Home
Ramsey Hill
I was up for a challenge on the way home so as I left Downtown I chose to leave via Ramsey Street – one of the steepest climbs I’ve encountered in Saint Paul. I had barely begun the ascent when I stopped to snap a few pictures of the large house at 319 Ramsey.

Perched over Ramsey Street like a royal overlooking her subjects, 319 is known today as the Arth House. According to myresearch, at least one law firm is located here. A wrap-around porch and three-sided area in the center-front of the house vie for the attention of passers by.

Perched over Ramsey Street like a royal overlooking her subjects, 319 is known today as the Arth House. According to my research, the Arth Law Firm is located here.

A wrap-around porch on the ground floor and three-sided rooms on the second and third floors vie for the attention of passers by.

A wrap-around porch on the ground floor and three-sided rooms on the second and third floors vie for the attention of passers by.

Large vases decorate both sides of the terraced staircase.

Large vases decorate both sides of the terraced stairs.

Then I turned my attention back to the Ramsey Street hill. On this day, it was the hill 2, me 0, meaning I stopped twice on the way up to catch my breath. The Ramsey Hill beat me on this ride, but I’ll be ready next time. The route I took on this 13.4 mile trip is here so please click on Garmin Connect.

Footnotes
(1) Saint Paul Historic Context Study Neighborhoods at the Edge of the Walking City, Prepared for
Historic Saint Paul,
City of Saint Paul Heritage Preservation Commission, and Ramsey County Historical Society
Saint Paul, Minnesota, b
y 
Mead & Hunt, Inc., 2011
(2) Hmong Archives website, http://www.hmongarchives.org/aboutus.html
(3) APALA Asian Pacific American Librarians Association website, http://www.apalaweb.org/about/
(4) Finance & Commerce website, January 15, 2015, Construction near for new Dorothy Day Center, Brian Johnson
http://finance-commerce.com/2015/01/construction-near-for-new-dorothy-day-center/
(5) St. Joseph’s Hospital History website, https://www.healtheast.org/st-josephs-hospital/about/history.html
(6) St. Paul Pioneer Press, Frederick Melo, 03/14/2012
(7) AIA Guide to the Twin Cities, page 337, Larry Millett

Schools, Pools, Beer and Deer

Macalester-Groveland, Highland Park, West End

Saturday, September 6, 2014    11.9 miles:

Randolph Heights Elementary School on Hamline Avenue in Macalester-Groveland.

Randolph Heights Elementary School on Hamline Avenue in Macalester-Groveland.

Students in Saint Paul went back to school this week, making the visit one of my favorite school buildings, Randolph Heights Elementary, apropos. This gorgeous 1916 building has several uncommon and attractive elements. The first is the Spanish-influenced design itself. Lead architect Charles Hausler visited schools in California and adopted qualities (stucco exterior, flat roof, curves and arches) into the design of Randolph Heights. (1)

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The frescoes above the front entrance are the second striking decorative element.  The young man sitting atop books with another in his hand, while the young woman rests upon a bench needlepointing is a great reflection of gender roles 100 years ago. Another atypical aspect to the original design of Randolph Heights is the swimming pool, long since covered, with the space used for other purposes.

Another angle of the front of Randolph Heights.

Another angle of the front of Randolph Heights.

Randolph Heights Elementary School cost $101,356 and some change to build, a premium price for a school with eight classrooms and 320 students. (By my figures, construction of the Randolph Heights classrooms averaged more than $12,600.) The May 1917 edition of the publication “School Education” strongly criticized Saint Paul school officials for their spending.

“The present city policy of erecting school buildings by force account is shown to be extravagant, and the cost of the recently completed Randolph Heights and Como schools is shown to be excessive. The proper unit cost of elementary school buildings is placed at approximately $7,000 per room…” (3)

Randolph Heights Elementary School in 1925. Photo courtesy courtesy Karen Duke and Randolph Heights.

Randolph Heights Elementary School in 1925. Photo courtesy Minnesota Historical Society.

On the other hand, the one-story design selected by Randolph Heights architects and the school district started a new trend.

“There is today an awakening on the subject of the one-story school. This volume presents that subject, and asks: ‘Why the peril of the upstairs school?’ As this is written, the school world is throbbing with a menace and its question is ‘Fire!’ The one-story school is one safe answer to that dominant peril of the school. And the one-story school answers other big questions; questions of hygiene, of health, of education.” (4)

From Randolph Heights Elementary I went east to Lexington Avenue. Though tempting, I didn’t take full advantage of the long downhill slope from Jefferson all the way to the intersection of Lexington, Montreal and West 7th. Rather, I weaved in and out among some of the streets that between Lexington and east to 35E. Otto Alaska At Otto and Alaska  I spotted this interesting design in the concrete steps.

The wall resembles Lucky Charms.

The wall resembles the marshmallows from Lucky Charms.

Next, back to Lexington and to a relatively new development of townhomes called Deer Park.

Public streets in Saint Paul feature green and white signs. The black and white Deer Park sign indicates it is a private road. The 11 townhomes here were built in 2003.

Public streets in Saint Paul feature green and white signs. The black and white Deer Park sign indicates it is a private road. The 11 townhomes here were built in 2003.

I stopped at Deer Park because there is a ‘hidden park’ behind the townhomes. (In City lingo it’s called a ‘passive’ or ‘ghost’ park.) Though there is absolutely no signage or other identification of Dawson Park, you’ll find it on some official Saint Paul maps and on the City’s list of parks. Perhaps most surprising is this two acre wooded refuge has been a City park since 1884! (5)

 The hidden park lies on the other side of this fence. I got access by walking through a gap in the fence.

The hidden park lies on the other side of this fence.

Now standing at the edge of Dawson Park looking back toward Lexington, you can see four of the Deer Park townhomes. I cut across the lawn of the townhouse on the left to get to the park.

Now standing at the edge of Dawson Park looking back toward Lexington, you can see four of the Deer Park townhomes. I cut across the lawn of the townhouse on the left to get to the park.

There are some lightly traveled paths through the woods but the brush is frequently thick and the mosquitoes even thicker.

There are some lightly traveled paths through the woods but the brush is frequently thick and the mosquitoes even thicker.

A short distance beyond the line of trees, the terrain suddenly climbs steeply up a bluff toward Edgcumbe Road and Place. Swarming mosquitoes and the bike shoes I wore dissuaded me from attempting to scale the incline, but I’ll be back.

One of few remaining small streams that meander above ground through Highland Park (the neighborhood.) Most of the steams here and elsewhere in Saint Paul were diverted into the storm sewer system years ago.

One of the many small springs that meander above ground through Highland Park (the neighborhood.) Many of the steams here and elsewhere in Saint Paul were diverted into the storm sewer system years ago.

Walsh Park is another hidden park just south of Dawson, according to the Parks Department maps and website but I have yet to search for it.

759 Lexington Parkway South has been Carol Sturgeleski’s home since 1963.

759 Lexington Parkway South has been Carol Sturgeleski’s home since 1963.

Back on the bike and moving north up the Lexington Hill, I stopped to talk with a woman on the sidewalk. Carol Sturgeleski told me she’s lived in Saint Paul her entire life and here at 759 Lexington, for 51 years. The way Carol and her husband, Bernie, found this home where they raised six children, is a story of coincidences. Her brother was selling his house in Eagan. The owner of 759 Lexington bought it. Carol and Bernie learned about 759 Lexington’s availability from her brother and they bought it.

Carol Sturgeleski stands in her back yard amongst the flowers and bird feeders.

Carol Sturgeleski stands in her back yard amongst the flowers and bird feeders.

“These are black walnut trees which are not too nice. Beautiful wood but when those black walnuts fall down they keep hitting my roof.”

At 50 feet wide and 170 deep Carol’s property is larger than the usual Saint Paul lot. Thick brush and woods at the back of the property make it more uncommon. “There’s a fence there. Can you see it right there in the middle part? It goes back there and I think there’s a nine foot easement in between and the people on the hill have the rest of it.” The woods, Carol said, are home to some animal friends like deer and turkey, that occasionally visit her yard, “We’ve had turkeys ‘cause my husband used to always feed the birds. At first it was fun and cute but after a while, they were digging up all my grass. They had such big claws and they just chewed up all the grass and whatever. So I said, ‘That’s enough of that. The cuteness is gone.’”

Carol  back yard as seen from the edge of her property.

Carol’s back yard as seen from the edge of her property.

Carol’s children enjoyed playing on the hill and woods, especially in winter. “When the kids were little they would slide down the hill. It was more open then. I’ll never forget when the second son came down and hit one of the trees. The kids brought him in the house and they brought him in the bathroom. All of a sudden he just collapsed, passed out.” Carol added that her son came to quickly. She also told me she wasn’t very worried because he had teeth knocked out playing hockey.

Today the woods behind Carol's house are choked with brush.

Today the woods behind Carol’s house are choked with brush but when her children were young, they sledded down the hill on the right.

After 51 years, Carol still loves where she lives. “In the middle of the city, it’s beautiful, but there’s a lot of work with this yard.” Fortunately, one of Carol’s sons now cuts the lawn for her and she’s contemplating hiring someone to do some of the other jobs. Just up the block, the home at 687 Lexington Parkway is obscured by a thick growth of bushes and trees but there is no missing it because of two landmarks in front.

Peace.

Peace.

The retaining wall in front of 687 Lex is cheerfully painted, giving the impression of perpetual spring.

The retaining wall in front of 687 Lex is cheerfully painted, giving the impression of perpetual spring.

Today’s second stop for a school is Riverside Elementary. Apparently it is unoccupied or lightly used.

Today’s second school visit is Riverside Elementary, mostly unchanged from when it was built in the 1920s. Apparently it is unoccupied or lightly used.

The Albion Street entrance to Riverside.

The Albion Street entrance to Riverside.

On the side of the building a metal stairway added as an emergency exit allowed me to peek into the second floor of Riverside. The old, maybe original, principal’s office door, is a nice artifact.

On the side of the building a metal stairway added as an emergency exit allowed me to peek into the second floor of Riverside. The old, perhaps original, principal’s office door, is a nice artifact.

Crosby Lake biz center 1

You’ll see this sign when you travel on West 7th Street.

Crosby Lake Business Center is a brownfield turned industrial park just south of West 7th Street in the West End. According to Saint Paul Port Authority figures, up to 400 jobs have been created by the companies that built on the 26-acre site.

It’s ironic that both companies credited with assisting the Port Authority with the Crosby Lake Business Center no longer exist.

It’s ironic that both companies credited with assisting the Port Authority with the Crosby Lake Business Center no longer exist.

Crosby Lake Business Center is nearly filled with businesses including a bakery, brewery, publisher, mechanical subcontractor and a manufacturer of labels and guest checks for the food service industry.

 Oven Hearth Bakery whips up wholesale breads and desserts. When the ovens are on, the smell will make you hungry.

Oven Hearth Bakery whips up wholesale breads and desserts. When the ovens are on, the smell will make you hungry.

EMC, Paradigm and JIST produce text books and related multimedia materials. Specifically, EMC publishes K through 12th grade text books in four subject areas; Paradigm publishes post-secondary text books about technology and science, and JIST publishes career assistance materials.

EMC, Paradigm and JIST produce text books and related multimedia materials. Specifically, EMC publishes K through 12th grade text books in four subject areas; Paradigm publishes post-secondary text books about technology and science, and JIST publishes career assistance materials.

Summit Brewing’s main building which can emit another great smell.

Summit Brewing’s main building which can emit another great smell.

Not only was Summit Brewery Minnesota’s first new brewery since World War II and the state’s first microbrewery, it’s also one of the most successful. Summit began production in 1986 in an old warehouse on University Avenue. (6) By 1997, demand for Summit’s beers grew so large it necessitated the construction of this brewery on Montreal Circle. Summit expanded in 2013 and in 2014, opened a canning facility. (7)

The large Summit logo on the side of the brewery.

The large Summit logo on the side of the brewery.

The entrance and beer garden both sit on the side of the brewery opposite Montreal Way.

The entrance and beer garden both sit on the side of the brewery opposite Montreal Way.

A beer skyway. The series of pipes carries beer from the brew house...

A beer skyway. The series of pipes carries beer from the brew house…

...to the recently completed canning facility.

…to the recently completed canning facility.

Thanks to the pioneering effort of Summit Brewing, new craft breweries now pop like dandelions in spring. There are close to a dozen microbreweries in Saint Paul, not including brew pubs.

The Crosby Lake Business Center has been great for Saint Paul’s economy, but some creativity with street names would have made the development less confusing.

Yes, all the streets in the Crosby Lake development are named Montreal but to confusing matters more, two different streets have the same address number.

Yes, all the streets in the Crosby Lake development are named Montreal but to confuse matters more, two different streets have the same address number. Instead, why not a Vancouver, Halifax, Saskatoon or Moose Jaw?

Back in Highland, just south of Edgcumbe at Montreal Avenue coincidentally, are two City buildings; the Highland Park Aquatic Center and SPPD Western District headquarters.

Back in Highland, just south of Edgcumbe at Montreal Avenue, coincidentally, are two City buildings; the Highland Park Aquatic Center and SPPD Western District headquarters.

The police department’s western district headquarters on Otto Hummer Drive.

The police department’s western district headquarters on Otto Hummer Drive.

Highland Park Aquatic Center sits on Otto Hummer Drive, a street that looks like a parking lot.

Highland Park Aquatic Center sits on Otto Hummer Drive, a street that looks like a parking lot.

Otto Hummer posthumously received the honor of this street being named for him because he volunteered for many City committees and for about a decade with the Highland Business Association. (8) It’s very unusual to see the Highland Park Aquatic Center parking lot busy in September but the unseasonably warm weather convinced City officials to keep the pool open more than a week beyond its usual closing date.

Although not very busy, a few folks are stretching the swimming season out as far as possible.

Although not very busy, a few folks are stretching the swimming season out as far as possible.

This aquatic center opened in August 1979 as the Highland Park Pool and has since remodeled. It is Highland’s second or third pool, depending on your perspective.

The original Highland Park Pool is long gone but significant artifacts remain just north of the aquatic center, across Montreal Avenue at Edgcumbe,  Most windows are covered in peeling plywood and the ones that aren’t have been smashed out. Sections of the Spanish-style terracotta roof tiles have fallen, exposing holes in the plywood deck and vegetation grows out of the building. The allure of the stone structure is obvious, despite the long list of indignities it’s suffered in the decades since closing.

The old Highland Park pool bath house is in desperate need of renovation.

The old Highland Park Pool bath house is in desperate need of renovation.

This is what the original Highland Park Pool looked like in 1935. The building in the background is the golf clubhouse, which still stands. Courtesy Minnesota Historical Society.

This is what the original Highland Park Pool looked like in 1935. The building in the background is the golf clubhouse, which still stands. Courtesy Minnesota Historical Society.

In less than two years the Highland Park Pool underwent quite a change. June 1937 photo Courtesy Minnesota Historical Society.

In less than two years the Highland Park Pool underwent quite a change. June 1937 photo Courtesy Minnesota Historical Society.

The original Highland pool bath house, a Works Progress Administration project, remains, albeit in disrepair.

The original Highland pool bath house, a Works Progress Administration project, remains, albeit in disrepair.

Windows and the doors of the bath house are covered in plywood to keep man, beast and Minnesota’s weather out.

Windows and the doors of the bath house are covered in plywood to keep man, beast and Minnesota’s weather out.

You can see the subroof and missing clay tiles.

You can see the subroof and missing clay tiles.

The back or pool side of the bath house. The pool was situated about where the grass is on the right. The round stone structure in the middle of the picture held a large tree.

The back or pool side of the bath house. The pool was situated about where the grass is on the right. The round stone structure in the middle of the picture held a large tree.

In 1962 a good sized tree grew in the middle of the stone planter. St. Paul Pioneer Press Dispatch photo courtesy of the Minnesota Historical Society.

In 1962 a good sized tree grew in the middle of the stone planter. St. Paul Pioneer Press Dispatch photo courtesy of the Minnesota Historical Society.

old pool house today 9

What may have been a locker or shower room. To get this shot I had to climb the stone wall and put my camera above my head and shoot through a fence.

What may have been a locker or shower room. To get this shot I had to climb the stone wall and put my camera above my head and shoot through a fence.

An out building that is part of the pool facility. It too was built by WPA workers in 1936.

An out building that is part of the pool facility. It too was built by WPA workers in 1936. It’s held less interest to explorers and vandals.

Today about the only activity around the grounds of the old pool is Frisbee golf and the occasional hiker.

Today about the only activity around the grounds of the old pool is Frisbee golf and the occasional hiker.

The Parks and Recreation Department in 2013 proposed stabilizing the historic bath house and studying its renovation and reuse. However, neither the 2014 or 2015 approved Capital Budget and Improvement Program set aside any money for either, meaning the landmarks deterioration will continue through at least 2015. In that budget, about 80 proposals-fire station expansion, recreation center and playground improvements, street and bridge reconstruction and many other worthy proposals-vie for the limited dollars. Preservation of historic facilities is important but whether it’s a higher priority than fire and safety services, park development or street maintenance and improvement is questionable. With far too little money for too many important projects, funding decisions will continue to be excruciatingly difficult, undoubtedly resulting in the loss of historic structures.

Click on the link to see the route of my September 6, 2014 ride:
www.mapmyride.com/routes/view/668229664

Footnotes
(1) History of SPPS document
(2) Ibid
(3) Page 42; May 1917 “School Education Magazine”
(4) Introduction, Pamphlets on Forest Utilization, Volume 10, February 1917, The One-Story Schoolhouse Idea with Plans of Model Schools, Fitzherbert Leather
(5) The Street Where You Live-A Guide to the Place Names of St. Paul, Donald L. Empson, Page 70
(6) Page 296, Land of Amber Waters, Doug Hoverson
(7) Summit Brewery website, http://www.summitbrewing.com/culture/history
(8) Geni.com website, http://www.geni.com/people/Otto-Hummer/6000000001051774266

Down South In Highland

August 27, 2014 Highland Park 12.1 Miles

When time is limited, Highland Park and Macalester-Groveland are my go-to rides because of their proximity to my house. This time, I rode on streets in the southern part of Highland, around West 7th Street.

It’s obvious that someone at 2039 Bordner Place is returning from a trip and what a nice welcome home it will be. I just hope the door decorations weren’t also an invitation to someone with mischievous intentions.

A colorful and friendly welcome back to some plucky travelers.

A colorful and friendly welcome back for some plucky travelers.

.

The zebra-striped mailbox is what I stopped for at 2021 Sheridan Avenue. Louise Langberg was outside doing chores so I asked to take a picture of the mailbox. Louise agreed and said the mailbox used to be a cat, but time, and Mother Nature, did in the wood head and tail, leaving the legs and the rusting torso.

Louise plans to replace the 20 year old cat mailbox. She has the wood but needs a buy a new mailbox.

Louise plans to replace the 20-year-old cat mailbox. She has the wood but needs a buy a new mailbox.

The mailbox led to a discussion about her home, “We moved in late September 1959 and we had six people living here. There was my two parents and four girls. Little by little everybody left beside me.”

Louise has lived in this house since 1959, 55 years.

Louise has lived in this house, 2021 Sheridan, since 1959, 55 years.

Eventually Louise bought the house from her mother, “I like the neighborhood. I knew the neighborhood and I knew the house. I didn’t have to worry about getting into a house and finding any surprises. I knew the good parts and the bad parts. I knew it needed a new furnace. I knew that it needed a new roof. Still, I knew what those problems were.”

Louise Langberg in front of her home at 2021 Sheridan Avenue in Highland Park.

Louise Langberg in front of her home at 2021 Sheridan Avenue in Highland Park.

The roof Louise mentioned; she couldn’t afford to hire someone to do it so she went to how-to clinics at a long-gone home repair store and then bought the shingles there, “I didn’t know that you could have somebody come if you buy shingles and have them placed upon the roof for you.” So Louise lugged bundles of shingles home little by little in her tiny car, “Then as I needed the shingles I would haul them up the ladder and they would just thud, a half a bundle of shingles up there.”

“A lot of the people must have moved in about the same time we did or started their families about the same time our family started, ‘cause there were kids around the neighborhood that were within a year or two of our own ages.”

Louise’s dad volunteered to help her, an offer she couldn’t refuse, “You’d tear off as many shingles as you knew you could replace because we both had work the next day and if it rained all the rain would still keep running off. We did a really nice job!”

“It’s been a nice quiet neighborhood. I remember when I talked to Debbie Montgomery; she was Saint Paul’s first lady cop; she said the cops loved it when they got to patrol Highland Park at night because if anyone else was out at that time of night, they didn’t belong there. So it was kinda quiet.”

That recollection brought another to Louise, “Many, many years ago, this must have been about 40 years ago, the guy was living there (next door), he didn’t have air conditioning and when the night got too hot he would sometimes just set out a cot in the backyard and sleep there. He never worried about anybody coming by and bothering him.”

Louise's dad planted this maple tree in the front yard when she and her sisters were young.

Louise’s dad planted this maple tree in the front yard when she and her sisters were young.

While the Sheridan Avenue neighborhood has seen the usual changes-neighbors have come and gone, houses repainted and trees growing tall-Louise told me it’s still a great place to live; quiet with neighbors who watch out for each other.

I’m exhausted just looking at the roof of this building. With that much venting going on, it had to be a laundry. The view is from Munster Avenue but the address is 2575 7th Street West.

I’m exhausted just looking at the roof of this building. With that much venting going on, it had to be a laundry. The view is from Munster Avenue but the address is 2575 7th Street West.

Frequently known as West 7th Street, it picked up the Fort Road nickname in the 19???? Because it goes past Fort Snelling. In reality, the River Road more closely approached the fort in earlier days.

One of the many apartment buildings, on West 7th at Wordsworth.

West 7th Street picked up the Fort Road name because it was one of the first streets to go from Downtown to Fort Snelling. An earlier iteration known as Old Fort Road traveled along the bluffs. William Davern, in 1891, bestowed the name Wordsworth on this street (avenue actually). Davern taught school at one time and picked the name in honor of poet William Wordsworth. (1)

The southern-most section of Highland Park (between Shepard Road and West 7th  on the north and south respectively and Edgecumbe on the west and I-35E on the east) has been home to immigrants from many countries for 30 or more years. Much of the area consists of apartments, with a smattering of single family housing and light industrial and businesses. woodstone apts

Woodstone is one of the aforementioned apartment complexes. I stopped here because of the Snoopy statue from the 2000  “Peanuts On Parade.” An estimated 450,000 people visited Saint Paul to see the 101 Peanuts statues. (2)

snoopy woodstone

Snoopy rests on his dog house while many Woodstocks peer out the windows.

Youngman Avenue is the north frontage road for Shepard Road.

Youngman Avenue is the north frontage road for Shepard Road.

 Youngman is also part of what some of the area apartment complexes have dubbed “Shepard Park.”

Youngman is also part of what some of the area apartment complexes have dubbed “Shepard Park.”

A block north on Rankin, high tension power lines overhang Stewart Avenue. Looking up  one of the towers, the supports and power lines create interesting geometric patterns.

A block north on Rankin, high tension power lines overhang Stewart Avenue. Looking up one of the towers, the supports and power lines create interesting geometric patterns.

Mickey’s “By Willie” at 1950 West 7th Street.

Mickey’s “By Willie” at 1950 West 7th Street.

Back on West 7th, I paused at the lesser known Mickey’s restaurant. Technically called Mickey’s “By Willie”, it doesn’t have the same visual élan as Mickey’s Diner at West 7th and St. Peter Downtown. Still, it’s open 24 hours, serves a similar menu, is old-55, and is owned by the same folks who have the Downtown diner. (3)

I spotted two old signs on Mickey’s property.

It's rare to see hand made signs like this one hanging outside Mickey’s.

It’s rare to see hand-made signs like this one hanging outside Mickey’s. What great attention to detail!

The payphone is long gone but this once-common sign still hangs on a pole above the parking lot at Mickey’s “By Willie.”

The payphone is long gone but this once-common sign still hangs on a pole above the parking lot at Mickey’s “By Willie.” I wonder how many people know what this sign means?

Tonight’s ride hit more than 20 Highland Park streets. Click on the following link for a map:

http://www.mapmyride.com/workout/edit/913728405/

Footnotes

(1) “The Street Where You Live: A Guide to the Place Names of St. Paul”, Donald L. Empson

(2) http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/saint-paul-kicks-off-encore-to-the-successful-peanuts-on-parade-summer-art-project-82327147.html

(3) http://www.twincitiesfun.com/Mickeys-by-Willy-ID002977.html